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twitter.com/_dmoser/status/136

This might be the most brutal murder strip I've ever seen. It's the bus that did it for me.

@basil What a stupid idea putting cyclist in danger like that. Everyone knows that the best way to protect cyclists is to physically separate a bike lane from cars.

@ericbuijs
I agree this painted lane is abysmally stupid. Still, there are bike pictograms painted on the pavement at regular intervals. Either those motorists are idiots, or they chose to blatantly ignore them. The fact that many just slow down in front of the coming cyclist, or switch lanes seems to indicate the latter. What a bunch of a-holes.
@basil

@normandc @ericbuijs
For sure, but to quote a highway designer I've spoken to.

"People are arseholes, we should design transport infrastructure accordingly."

@basil @normandc

A recent development here in the Netherlands is the bicycle street. Bicycle streets flip the natural hierarchy and make bicyclists the dominant user of the street, while motorists must act as “guests”. Interestingly, a motorist can speed on a bicycle street but they automatically lower their speed once a street is converted. The psychology is not to be underestimated here.

beyondtheautomobile.com/2020/1

@ericbuijs
This is so interesting. And the blog author is from Toronto!

One of the prerequisites of a bicycle street, more bike traffic than car traffic, may not be possible for many years in my car-centric city (Quebec City). Although my sister lived for one year on a street with a bike lane that would fit the bill. Bike traffic in biking season was continuous. Unfortunately, the bike lane is very short. Short bike lanes criss-cross a few districts without offering a straight path.
@basil

@normandc The cycling situation in Belgium (our southern neighboring country) is hopeless. Nevertheless the city of Ghent managed to turn that situation around in a relative short period of time. What is needed is politicians that take the situation seriously and act accordingly. The Ghent mobility plan can be read as a blueprint for other cities willing to change.

eltis.org/sites/default/files/

@basil

@ericbuijs
The current city administration has been bicycle friendly, as much as North American cities will be. But I doubt they're willing to do more than add bicycle lanes here and there. There's a strong right-leaning, climate change-denying, pro-automobile population here, influenced by trash talking talk radio hosts. There's a tramway project pushed by the city, clashing with a project to build a 3rd bridge over the St.Lawrence River that will only encourage more cars. 🙄
@basil

@normandc A sad state of affairs. It seems to me that the political right is making gains all over the globe and with it they'll destroy the earth.

@basil

@ericbuijs @normandc @basil Oh, there's a bunch that needs to be stopped, that's for sure. They're gunning for human extinction, which everyone else needs to start not tolerating in massive degrees.

@ericbuijs
The right has always been stronger here than in Montréal. I don't know if it's because it's the seat of the provincial legislature, with much of the provincial government employees here. To be honest, as someone who has a few government employees in my close family, I can understand the animosity towards wasteful public spending. It doesn't help that most of them are disconnected from the people's reality, and always complain about their working conditions. 🙄
@basil

@basil This was a no-context video post, though... there's been follow-up since (this appears to be a mistake while changing to a bike lane): https://twitter.com/AlTi5/status/1362370705778757633
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